Nº. 1 of  162

I Am Published

A wanton girls random scribblings that she pretends are writing

When I was a kid, I thought a lot about what made me different from the other kids. I don’t think I was smarter than them and I certainly wasn’t more talented. And I definitely can’t claim I was a harder worker — I’ve never worked particularly hard, I’ve always just tried doing things I find fun. Instead, what I concluded was that I was more curious — but not because I had been born that way. If you watch little kids, they are intensely curious, always exploring and trying to figure out how things work. The problem is that school drives all that curiosity out. Instead of letting you explore things for yourself, it tells you that you have to read these particular books and answer these particular questions. And if you try to do something else instead, you’ll get in trouble. Very few people’s curiosity can survive that. But, due to some accident, mine did. I kept being curious and just followed my curiosity.

Open-access champion and RSS co-creator Aaron Swartz, who took his own life last week at the age of 26, echoes Neil deGrasse Tyson, Isaac Asimov, and Sir Ken Robinson. A heartbreaking loss in innumerable ways.

Some thoughts on Aaron’s legacy in digital culture from Stanford’s Jennifer Granick.

( Daring Fireball)

(Source: , via scinerds)

aamukherjee:

Kinematics Problem 2 (30 points)
Mr/Mrs. Test Designer, you monster…

aamukherjee:

Kinematics Problem 2 (30 points)

Mr/Mrs. Test Designer, you monster

(via scinerds)

salander85:

best-of-funny:

consultingcompanioninthetardis:

lizthefangirl:

These are the heroes of our generation.

My people

X

I pray for these students to walk in my class.

(Source: glitterbites)

thesoundofonebrainthinking:

People in Ferguson Still Need Help!

This website contains a wealth of useful information on ways to help the people in Ferguson, how you can organize and participate locally, and helps to spread the word and keep the message strong.

(via gentlehousing)


How The West Was Stolen
On February 2, 1848, representatives of the United States and Mexico signed the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, ending what the US called the “Mexican-American War,” known in Mexico as the “War of United States Intervention.”
Overnight, more than a hundred thousand Mexican citizens became foreigners in their own country. Although the TGH included safeguards protecting land rights, respecting the culture and language of Mexicans, this was never honored.
164 years later, many families are still fighting for their land. This fight is especially strong in New Mexico and Texas, states that saw extended land disputes well into the twentieth century.
The justification for this war was based on the notion of “Manifest Destiny,” or the divine right to continental expansion. Essentially, religion used to excuse a racist land grab.
As we’ve seen recently in Arizona, there’s a concerted effort to keep our youth from studying the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and other important parts of Mexican history in the United States. It illustrates how  after 164 years the Mexican-American war is still being fought, albeit more so with legislation than with invading armies.
For Mexicans living in the United States, especially those in the Southwest, February 2 is a day to remember that “we didn’t cross the border, the border crossed us.” Let us never forget this. 

How The West Was Stolen

On February 2, 1848, representatives of the United States and Mexico signed the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, ending what the US called the “Mexican-American War,” known in Mexico as the “War of United States Intervention.”

Overnight, more than a hundred thousand Mexican citizens became foreigners in their own country. Although the TGH included safeguards protecting land rights, respecting the culture and language of Mexicans, this was never honored.

164 years later, many families are still fighting for their land. This fight is especially strong in New Mexico and Texas, states that saw extended land disputes well into the twentieth century.

The justification for this war was based on the notion of “Manifest Destiny,” or the divine right to continental expansion. Essentially, religion used to excuse a racist land grab.

As we’ve seen recently in Arizona, there’s a concerted effort to keep our youth from studying the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and other important parts of Mexican history in the United States. It illustrates how  after 164 years the Mexican-American war is still being fought, albeit more so with legislation than with invading armies.

For Mexicans living in the United States, especially those in the Southwest, February 2 is a day to remember that “we didn’t cross the border, the border crossed us.” Let us never forget this. 

(Source: thinkmexican, via fuckyeahmexico)

so-personal:

Caution! My blog may cure your boredom ;)!

so-personal:

Caution! My blog may cure your boredom ;)!

(Source: m0rtality, via johanta)

ionic-columns:

Pope Urban VIII, Gian Lorenzo Bernini. Around 1635. Italian Baroque.
Bernini is one of the most famous sculptors of all time—his artwork stands out for the fluidity of the drapery and the realistic, captivating emotions of his creations. He is also more notorious for his provocative piece of The Ecstasy of St. Teresa, where this very holy woman is experiencing spiritual rapture (but really, it just looks like she’s having an orgasm). Bernini, a devout Catholic, was rather fond of aggravating the then-corrupt Church.
The Baroque period is notable for its powerful religious scenes and glorification of the Roman Catholic Church after the Protestant Reformation, when many people left the Catholic faith.

ionic-columns:

Pope Urban VIII, Gian Lorenzo Bernini. Around 1635. Italian Baroque.

Bernini is one of the most famous sculptors of all time—his artwork stands out for the fluidity of the drapery and the realistic, captivating emotions of his creations. He is also more notorious for his provocative piece of The Ecstasy of St. Teresa, where this very holy woman is experiencing spiritual rapture (but really, it just looks like she’s having an orgasm). Bernini, a devout Catholic, was rather fond of aggravating the then-corrupt Church.

The Baroque period is notable for its powerful religious scenes and glorification of the Roman Catholic Church after the Protestant Reformation, when many people left the Catholic faith.

(Source: post-impressionisms, via caravaggista)

startorrent02:

konguloarkonan:

someone on metafilter figured out that the ferguson PD is running the support darren wilson gofundme

Just read through ALL of this…these people are INCREDIBLY organized and have collected almost every piece of information out - and they are asking some amazing questions.

(via 1demise)

thegetty:

"Spend five minutes with this sarcophagus and you’ll witness a whole night—and a passionate one at that. Zeus, somewhat put out because Selene (goddess of the moon) had fallen in love with the mortal Endymion, cast the beautiful young man into an eternal sleep. But that didn’t stop Selene from visiting her beloved every night. You can see her at the center of this sarcophagus as darkness falls, stepping off from her chariot. But as you look to the right, beyond the slumbering Endymion, the next day begins to dawn (too soon!), and the horses must rush the goddess of the moon away, until the next evening’s amorous encounter." 

Recommended viewing for slowartday from our antiquities curator, David Saunders.

To zoom in and let your “eyes” wander, click here.

Sarcophagus panel (detail), about A.D. 210, Roman. Marble, 84 1/4 in. long x 21 3/8 in. high. The J. Paul Getty Museum, 

supernaturallysadie:

Real life fairytale.

(Source: feeltheinside, via ahahahashley)

Good art provides people with a vocabulary about things they can’t articulate.

—Mos Def (Yasiin Bey)

(Source: daughterofzami, via hartboy)

venus-infleurs:

“To banish imperfection is to destroy expression, to check exertion, to paralyze vitality.” 
― John Ruskin, The Stones of Venice


I simply cannot get over these drawings. I adore Ruskin. I can’t wait to revisit Venice

(Source: ladyoleander, via caravaggista)

I feel that art has something to do with the achievement of stillness in the midst of chaos. A stillness which characterizes prayer, too, and the eye of the storm. I think that art has something to do with an arrest of attention in the midst of distraction.

Saul Bellow (via jaded-mandarin)

(Source: likeafieldmouse, via jaded-mandarin)

fuckies:

I appreciate fine art and fine boys.

(via imaginefight)

Nº. 1 of  162